nmaahc:

Married, but separated on different plantations William and Ellen Craft devised a plan to escape the horrors of slavery.Ellen, who was very fair-skinned, passed as a young white man. Her husband William played her doting servant.They set out on December 21, 1848 and traveled luxuriously by train and ferry. During a four-day trip they were almost thwarted, but quick wits and good old-fashioned luck kept them on their way. After arriving in the free city of Philadelphia they were given a crash course in reading and writing. After a short stay, they moved to Boston ere William resumed work as a cabinetmaker and Ellen became a seamstress. Two year later slave catchers showed up, but they quickly fled to England to avoid their captors. They remained in Europe for over 20 years and had five children. In 1860, the couple wrote “Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom,” chronicling the escape. The Craft’s returned to the United States in the 1870s and established a school for newly freed African Americans.Learn more about their story in Smithsonian Magazine. 

nmaahc:

Married, but separated on different plantations William and Ellen Craft devised a plan to escape the horrors of slavery.

Ellen, who was very fair-skinned, passed as a young white man. Her husband William played her doting servant.They set out on December 21, 1848 and traveled luxuriously by train and ferry. During a four-day trip they were almost thwarted, but quick wits and good old-fashioned luck kept them on their way. After arriving in the free city of Philadelphia they were given a crash course in reading and writing. After a short stay, they moved to Boston ere William resumed work as a cabinetmaker and Ellen became a seamstress. Two year later slave catchers showed up, but they quickly fled to England to avoid their captors. They remained in Europe for over 20 years and had five children. 

In 1860, the couple wrote “Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom,” chronicling the escape. The Craft’s returned to the United States in the 1870s and established a school for newly freed African Americans.

Learn more about their story in Smithsonian Magazine

vintagesportspictures:

American bobsled team (1948)

The essential argument is: men like long hair, and what sane woman would ever want to do anything that decreases her capacity to please men?

The advantage of articles like this, pantomimic though they be, is that they make misogyny legible.

[…]

My own “game” hasn’t suffered at all from having short hair, and it’s a really good way of filtering out the douchecanoes. Neo-misogynists tend not to want to sleep with me, date me or wife me up however I wear my hair, because after five minutes of conversation it tends to transpire that I’m precisely the sort of mouthy, ambitious, slutty feminist banshee who haunts their nightmares, but if I keep my hair short we tend to waste less of each other’s time. If you’ve a ladyboner for sexist schmuckweasels, short hair isn’t going to help, although they might let you administer a disappointing hand-job.

Laurie Penny on why patriarchy fears the scissors and short hair is a political statement for women (via explore-blog)

(Source: questionall)

darkryemag:

I’m going to go ahead and imprint my own favourite onto this, because it’s got to be close: vichychoisse. All that subtle, rich, creamy family of blended soups founded on the humble potato. Never many ingredients, but truly and simply the most comforting thing you can possibly make in twenty minutes or less.
A nice thick layer of chopped leeks in a very healthy chunk of butter and a glop of olive oil. Let them cook in a mellow way until soft and loose. Then add chopped potato, a bunch, and vegetable stock, maybe four cups or five, only just enough to let the potatoes all have some moisture. And fresh grated nutmeg and pepper and salt. Then you let it simmer. Then an immersion blender, when everything is completely pliable, and whirr it up until completely smooth. Then add milk or cream, depending on how much of a sinner you are, until it looks right.
This could be with parsnips, maybe, or cauliflower. But the essence is the same. This is the soup that will always, without fail, make you better.

darkryemag:

I’m going to go ahead and imprint my own favourite onto this, because it’s got to be close: vichychoisse. All that subtle, rich, creamy family of blended soups founded on the humble potato. Never many ingredients, but truly and simply the most comforting thing you can possibly make in twenty minutes or less.

A nice thick layer of chopped leeks in a very healthy chunk of butter and a glop of olive oil. Let them cook in a mellow way until soft and loose. Then add chopped potato, a bunch, and vegetable stock, maybe four cups or five, only just enough to let the potatoes all have some moisture. And fresh grated nutmeg and pepper and salt. Then you let it simmer. Then an immersion blender, when everything is completely pliable, and whirr it up until completely smooth. Then add milk or cream, depending on how much of a sinner you are, until it looks right.

This could be with parsnips, maybe, or cauliflower. But the essence is the same. This is the soup that will always, without fail, make you better.

(Source: figure20)

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