mikeacase:

I started taking running seriously on the morning of July 4. Seriously means I had shorts dedicated to the activity and I was tracking my progress on Fitbit. More monumentally, it also meant I was willing to kick off America’s birthday with something that wasn’t reciting all of Jeff Goldblum’s…

<3

darkryemag:

There would be an audible squeal if I got a hold of that plate.

4himglory:

Rhubarb Crumble Macarons | Twigg Studios

Amazing, but who actually has the time to do this.

(Source: 4him.glory)

Nothing beats an equality GIF. Can’t wait to see what this GIF will look like after the next 10 years.

Original post: http://www.vox.com/2014/5/17/5724306/watch-marriage-equality-win-in-one-amazing-gif

nmaahc:

Married, but separated on different plantations William and Ellen Craft devised a plan to escape the horrors of slavery.Ellen, who was very fair-skinned, passed as a young white man. Her husband William played her doting servant.They set out on December 21, 1848 and traveled luxuriously by train and ferry. During a four-day trip they were almost thwarted, but quick wits and good old-fashioned luck kept them on their way. After arriving in the free city of Philadelphia they were given a crash course in reading and writing. After a short stay, they moved to Boston ere William resumed work as a cabinetmaker and Ellen became a seamstress. Two year later slave catchers showed up, but they quickly fled to England to avoid their captors. They remained in Europe for over 20 years and had five children. In 1860, the couple wrote “Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom,” chronicling the escape. The Craft’s returned to the United States in the 1870s and established a school for newly freed African Americans.Learn more about their story in Smithsonian Magazine. 

nmaahc:

Married, but separated on different plantations William and Ellen Craft devised a plan to escape the horrors of slavery.

Ellen, who was very fair-skinned, passed as a young white man. Her husband William played her doting servant.They set out on December 21, 1848 and traveled luxuriously by train and ferry. During a four-day trip they were almost thwarted, but quick wits and good old-fashioned luck kept them on their way. After arriving in the free city of Philadelphia they were given a crash course in reading and writing. After a short stay, they moved to Boston ere William resumed work as a cabinetmaker and Ellen became a seamstress. Two year later slave catchers showed up, but they quickly fled to England to avoid their captors. They remained in Europe for over 20 years and had five children. 

In 1860, the couple wrote “Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom,” chronicling the escape. The Craft’s returned to the United States in the 1870s and established a school for newly freed African Americans.

Learn more about their story in Smithsonian Magazine

vintagesportspictures:

American bobsled team (1948)

The essential argument is: men like long hair, and what sane woman would ever want to do anything that decreases her capacity to please men?

The advantage of articles like this, pantomimic though they be, is that they make misogyny legible.

[…]

My own “game” hasn’t suffered at all from having short hair, and it’s a really good way of filtering out the douchecanoes. Neo-misogynists tend not to want to sleep with me, date me or wife me up however I wear my hair, because after five minutes of conversation it tends to transpire that I’m precisely the sort of mouthy, ambitious, slutty feminist banshee who haunts their nightmares, but if I keep my hair short we tend to waste less of each other’s time. If you’ve a ladyboner for sexist schmuckweasels, short hair isn’t going to help, although they might let you administer a disappointing hand-job.

Laurie Penny on why patriarchy fears the scissors and short hair is a political statement for women (via explore-blog)

(Source: questionall)

archive older ›
"...my life itself was become my amusement and never ceased to be novel."
- Thoreau

Ask
theme by Conkers